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confettigarden:

(via Pin by Stone Fox Bride on Molly’s Obsessions | Pinterest)
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pansexualrevolutionary:

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archiemcphee:

For a project entitled Rouleaux, French multimedia artist Anastassia Elias (previously featured here) creates enchanting silhouetted scenes inside humble cardboard toilet paper tubes.

"Lit from behind, her delightful cardboard scenes appear like stills from a mysterious work of shadow puppetry. Here, the roll, most commonly a piece of trash associated with the mundane rituals of domestic life, becomes elevated to the realm of high art. Elias’s visual narratives span time and space; as surely as summer swings fade to frigid snowmen, we move from an underwater universe to the barber shop around the corner."

The paper shapes are cut from paper the same colour as the cardboard roll, which give them the illusion of being part of the roll itself. They’re carefully positioned inside the roll using tweezers. Each delicate piece takes up to several hours to complete.
Elias recently self-published a book of her Rouleaux pieces, currently available here. The pieces themselves are currently on exhibit at the National Museum of Singapore until August 3, 2014.
Visit Anastassia Elias’ website to check out more of her artwork, including more Rouleaux.
[via Design Taxi and Beautiful/Decay]
archiemcphee:

For a project entitled Rouleaux, French multimedia artist Anastassia Elias (previously featured here) creates enchanting silhouetted scenes inside humble cardboard toilet paper tubes.

"Lit from behind, her delightful cardboard scenes appear like stills from a mysterious work of shadow puppetry. Here, the roll, most commonly a piece of trash associated with the mundane rituals of domestic life, becomes elevated to the realm of high art. Elias’s visual narratives span time and space; as surely as summer swings fade to frigid snowmen, we move from an underwater universe to the barber shop around the corner."

The paper shapes are cut from paper the same colour as the cardboard roll, which give them the illusion of being part of the roll itself. They’re carefully positioned inside the roll using tweezers. Each delicate piece takes up to several hours to complete.
Elias recently self-published a book of her Rouleaux pieces, currently available here. The pieces themselves are currently on exhibit at the National Museum of Singapore until August 3, 2014.
Visit Anastassia Elias’ website to check out more of her artwork, including more Rouleaux.
[via Design Taxi and Beautiful/Decay]
archiemcphee:

For a project entitled Rouleaux, French multimedia artist Anastassia Elias (previously featured here) creates enchanting silhouetted scenes inside humble cardboard toilet paper tubes.

"Lit from behind, her delightful cardboard scenes appear like stills from a mysterious work of shadow puppetry. Here, the roll, most commonly a piece of trash associated with the mundane rituals of domestic life, becomes elevated to the realm of high art. Elias’s visual narratives span time and space; as surely as summer swings fade to frigid snowmen, we move from an underwater universe to the barber shop around the corner."

The paper shapes are cut from paper the same colour as the cardboard roll, which give them the illusion of being part of the roll itself. They’re carefully positioned inside the roll using tweezers. Each delicate piece takes up to several hours to complete.
Elias recently self-published a book of her Rouleaux pieces, currently available here. The pieces themselves are currently on exhibit at the National Museum of Singapore until August 3, 2014.
Visit Anastassia Elias’ website to check out more of her artwork, including more Rouleaux.
[via Design Taxi and Beautiful/Decay]
archiemcphee:

For a project entitled Rouleaux, French multimedia artist Anastassia Elias (previously featured here) creates enchanting silhouetted scenes inside humble cardboard toilet paper tubes.

"Lit from behind, her delightful cardboard scenes appear like stills from a mysterious work of shadow puppetry. Here, the roll, most commonly a piece of trash associated with the mundane rituals of domestic life, becomes elevated to the realm of high art. Elias’s visual narratives span time and space; as surely as summer swings fade to frigid snowmen, we move from an underwater universe to the barber shop around the corner."

The paper shapes are cut from paper the same colour as the cardboard roll, which give them the illusion of being part of the roll itself. They’re carefully positioned inside the roll using tweezers. Each delicate piece takes up to several hours to complete.
Elias recently self-published a book of her Rouleaux pieces, currently available here. The pieces themselves are currently on exhibit at the National Museum of Singapore until August 3, 2014.
Visit Anastassia Elias’ website to check out more of her artwork, including more Rouleaux.
[via Design Taxi and Beautiful/Decay]
archiemcphee:

For a project entitled Rouleaux, French multimedia artist Anastassia Elias (previously featured here) creates enchanting silhouetted scenes inside humble cardboard toilet paper tubes.

"Lit from behind, her delightful cardboard scenes appear like stills from a mysterious work of shadow puppetry. Here, the roll, most commonly a piece of trash associated with the mundane rituals of domestic life, becomes elevated to the realm of high art. Elias’s visual narratives span time and space; as surely as summer swings fade to frigid snowmen, we move from an underwater universe to the barber shop around the corner."

The paper shapes are cut from paper the same colour as the cardboard roll, which give them the illusion of being part of the roll itself. They’re carefully positioned inside the roll using tweezers. Each delicate piece takes up to several hours to complete.
Elias recently self-published a book of her Rouleaux pieces, currently available here. The pieces themselves are currently on exhibit at the National Museum of Singapore until August 3, 2014.
Visit Anastassia Elias’ website to check out more of her artwork, including more Rouleaux.
[via Design Taxi and Beautiful/Decay]
archiemcphee:

For a project entitled Rouleaux, French multimedia artist Anastassia Elias (previously featured here) creates enchanting silhouetted scenes inside humble cardboard toilet paper tubes.

"Lit from behind, her delightful cardboard scenes appear like stills from a mysterious work of shadow puppetry. Here, the roll, most commonly a piece of trash associated with the mundane rituals of domestic life, becomes elevated to the realm of high art. Elias’s visual narratives span time and space; as surely as summer swings fade to frigid snowmen, we move from an underwater universe to the barber shop around the corner."

The paper shapes are cut from paper the same colour as the cardboard roll, which give them the illusion of being part of the roll itself. They’re carefully positioned inside the roll using tweezers. Each delicate piece takes up to several hours to complete.
Elias recently self-published a book of her Rouleaux pieces, currently available here. The pieces themselves are currently on exhibit at the National Museum of Singapore until August 3, 2014.
Visit Anastassia Elias’ website to check out more of her artwork, including more Rouleaux.
[via Design Taxi and Beautiful/Decay]
archiemcphee:

For a project entitled Rouleaux, French multimedia artist Anastassia Elias (previously featured here) creates enchanting silhouetted scenes inside humble cardboard toilet paper tubes.

"Lit from behind, her delightful cardboard scenes appear like stills from a mysterious work of shadow puppetry. Here, the roll, most commonly a piece of trash associated with the mundane rituals of domestic life, becomes elevated to the realm of high art. Elias’s visual narratives span time and space; as surely as summer swings fade to frigid snowmen, we move from an underwater universe to the barber shop around the corner."

The paper shapes are cut from paper the same colour as the cardboard roll, which give them the illusion of being part of the roll itself. They’re carefully positioned inside the roll using tweezers. Each delicate piece takes up to several hours to complete.
Elias recently self-published a book of her Rouleaux pieces, currently available here. The pieces themselves are currently on exhibit at the National Museum of Singapore until August 3, 2014.
Visit Anastassia Elias’ website to check out more of her artwork, including more Rouleaux.
[via Design Taxi and Beautiful/Decay]
archiemcphee:

For a project entitled Rouleaux, French multimedia artist Anastassia Elias (previously featured here) creates enchanting silhouetted scenes inside humble cardboard toilet paper tubes.

"Lit from behind, her delightful cardboard scenes appear like stills from a mysterious work of shadow puppetry. Here, the roll, most commonly a piece of trash associated with the mundane rituals of domestic life, becomes elevated to the realm of high art. Elias’s visual narratives span time and space; as surely as summer swings fade to frigid snowmen, we move from an underwater universe to the barber shop around the corner."

The paper shapes are cut from paper the same colour as the cardboard roll, which give them the illusion of being part of the roll itself. They’re carefully positioned inside the roll using tweezers. Each delicate piece takes up to several hours to complete.
Elias recently self-published a book of her Rouleaux pieces, currently available here. The pieces themselves are currently on exhibit at the National Museum of Singapore until August 3, 2014.
Visit Anastassia Elias’ website to check out more of her artwork, including more Rouleaux.
[via Design Taxi and Beautiful/Decay]
archiemcphee:

For a project entitled Rouleaux, French multimedia artist Anastassia Elias (previously featured here) creates enchanting silhouetted scenes inside humble cardboard toilet paper tubes.

"Lit from behind, her delightful cardboard scenes appear like stills from a mysterious work of shadow puppetry. Here, the roll, most commonly a piece of trash associated with the mundane rituals of domestic life, becomes elevated to the realm of high art. Elias’s visual narratives span time and space; as surely as summer swings fade to frigid snowmen, we move from an underwater universe to the barber shop around the corner."

The paper shapes are cut from paper the same colour as the cardboard roll, which give them the illusion of being part of the roll itself. They’re carefully positioned inside the roll using tweezers. Each delicate piece takes up to several hours to complete.
Elias recently self-published a book of her Rouleaux pieces, currently available here. The pieces themselves are currently on exhibit at the National Museum of Singapore until August 3, 2014.
Visit Anastassia Elias’ website to check out more of her artwork, including more Rouleaux.
[via Design Taxi and Beautiful/Decay]
archiemcphee:

For a project entitled Rouleaux, French multimedia artist Anastassia Elias (previously featured here) creates enchanting silhouetted scenes inside humble cardboard toilet paper tubes.

"Lit from behind, her delightful cardboard scenes appear like stills from a mysterious work of shadow puppetry. Here, the roll, most commonly a piece of trash associated with the mundane rituals of domestic life, becomes elevated to the realm of high art. Elias’s visual narratives span time and space; as surely as summer swings fade to frigid snowmen, we move from an underwater universe to the barber shop around the corner."

The paper shapes are cut from paper the same colour as the cardboard roll, which give them the illusion of being part of the roll itself. They’re carefully positioned inside the roll using tweezers. Each delicate piece takes up to several hours to complete.
Elias recently self-published a book of her Rouleaux pieces, currently available here. The pieces themselves are currently on exhibit at the National Museum of Singapore until August 3, 2014.
Visit Anastassia Elias’ website to check out more of her artwork, including more Rouleaux.
[via Design Taxi and Beautiful/Decay]
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aplaceforart:

via BobbieLouFabric / more art here
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